Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award

The Seventh Wish

Messner, Kate, The Seventh Wish.

Charlie feels like she’s always coming in last. From her Mom’s new job to her sister’s life away at college, everything else seems more important than Charlie’s upcoming Irish dance competition, her science project, or how much she misses her sister. One day, while ice-fishing, Charlie catches a fish which offers to grant her a wish in exchange for its freedom. The most serious plot point involves the discovery of her older sister’s heroin addiction, and her subsequent treatment.

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Save Me a Seat

Weeks, Sarah, and Gita Varadarajan.​ Save Me a Seat.

A new boy from India and a New Jersey kid find they have much more in common then they first imagined as they navigate their first week of fifth grade.  This humorous and touching story told through the alternating perspectives of Ravi and Joe tell the story of how misperceptions, school bullies and doting Moms are the perfect recipe for the most unexpected friendships.

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The Littlest Bigfoot

Weiner, Jennifer. The Littlest Bigfoot.

Brimming with equal parts humor and heartbreak, The Littlest Bigfoot is an irresistible adventure about friendship, furry creatures, and finding the place where you belong.

 

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Awkward

9780316381321Peppi  is the new kid and just wants to fit in, but in an effort to keep from being bullied, she’s managed to hurt the one person who tried to be nice to her on her first day of school- a boy named Jaimie. Can Jaimie and Peppi still become friends and join forces to help their school… or is it just all too awkward?

 

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23 Comments »

Unfriended

When thirteen-year-old Truly is invited to sit at the Popular Table by a former best friend, she willingly goes, leaving behind her good friend Hazel. She is surprised at how nice the popular kids are, and how mean Hazel has become. Before she knows what’s happening, Truly finds herself caught in a web of lies and misunderstandings, made all the worse by the relentlessly public social media world. Told from the point-of-view of six eighth-grade boys and girls, the story unfolds with complexity and no easy answers, revealing the insecurities that each person feels, regardless of popularity status.
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